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MBA Jobs: Internet Search

If you dedicate a specified amount of time each week to using the World Wide Web for your job search, you will have more options to use than available time. Here is how the MBA PCC recommends you dedicate your time, listed by expected level of payoff.

1) Use eRecruiting http://msumba.erecruiting.com/er/security/login.jsp and MonsterTrak

http://www.bus.msu.edu/learcenter/monstertrak/ to look for positions recruited through MSU.

2) Apply to company home pages - go right to the source

  • Many companies require applying on-line at some point, even within their own on-campus recruiting process.
  • Even if they do not, it is recommended that you apply on-line to every company you are interested in.
  • Apply for every position you are interested in.
  • Apply every month or so as new positions are posted.
  • Keep a text only version of your resume for easy pasting into web sites. See other handout for details on Scannable resumes.
3) Develop a list of target companies

  • Use the CareerSearch database (via MonsterTrak), for geographical or industry-based searches.
4) Prepare for interviews using web, especially using

  • WetFeet.com, Vault.com (both via eRecruiting), and MBAjungle.com.
  • Gast Business library literature search to learn about company and industry information
5) Use MBA-specific or functional-specific (for example, marketing, council of logistics management) web pages, such as SpencerStuart.Com, MBAJungle.com, and headhunters' home pages

  • Expect there to be few matching postings on these pages.
  • On these pages, you can expect to be exposed only to the person who posted the position (third party firm), as opposed to the whole company as when applying to the company's own web page.
  • For the future: Keep in mind, that no matter how confidential the site there is always the risk that a current employer will find you listed there (not relevant for current students). Responses to this can range from raises to keep you "salvaging", discipline if you are found looking again, to termination in the next round of downsizing or restructuring. Also, some web sites "raid" other web sites with "spiders" and re-post your resume to new sites.
  • Visit the “important links on the “Current Students” section of the MBA website (http://mba.bus.msu.edu).
6) Use web for networking, with sites like Classmates.com, Alumni.net, AlumniLink, eProNet, YoPro, Friendster, LinkedIn, 6degrees.com, Ryze.com, Tribe.net, any Yahoo groups, and Meetup.com, etc.

  • Using these sites may connect you with classmates, alumni, former coworkers, members of professional associations who can help you contact the people you need to network. Remember the principle of "Six Degrees of Separation".
7) Use web for larger postings and resumes, on large boards like monster.com.

  • Expect a lower payoff. While there are many jobs posted, they cover a large number of positions and levels.
  • The initial registration or search engines on these may not be adequate for delivering positions like those you are searching for.
  • For the future: Keep in mind, that now matter how confidential the site there is always the risk that a current employer will find you listed there. Responses to this can range from raises to keep you "salvaging", discipline if you are found looking again, to termination in the next round of downsizing or restructuring. Also, some web sites "raid" other web sites with "spiders" and re-post your resume to new sites.
8) Personal Home pages (using your own website to market yourself)

  • Are a very passive way of searching for a position
  • Proper keywords and registration of the site are important
  • There are web robot and crawlers (“spiders”) that go out looking for sites based on some criteria, but if they do not find you, or enough information on the site, they will not be productive. These are quickly becoming less popular.
  • These may also have some legal implications, and may not be as good a sell of you as you think if you use if for both personal and job search persons. Avoid letting recruiters know age, ethnicity, gender, religious beliefs, and if you are a bad golfer.

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